“Don’t ever tell anybody anything. If you do, you start missing everybody.”


The cover of the 1985 Bantam edition.
Image via Wikipedia

“I’m sick of just liking people. I wish to God I could meet somebody I could respect.”

Take the austere little paperbacks down from the shelf and you can hold the collected works of J.D. Salinger — one novel, three volumes of stories — in the palm of one hand. Like some of his favorite writers — like Sappho, whom we know only from ancient fragments, or the Japanese poets who crafted 17-syllable haikus — Salinger was an author whose large reputation pivots on very little. The first of his published stories that he thought were good enough to preserve between covers appeared in the New Yorker in 1948. Sixteen years later he placed one last story there and drew down the shades.

“Grand. There’s a word I really hate. It’s a phoney. I could puke every time I hear it”

One Response

  1. “I was the only one left in the tomb then. I sort of liked it, in a way. It was so nice and peaceful”

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